Have you been subjected to a hate crime or a hate incident?

If you have you can report this through Citizens Advice Manchester.

We are a registered reporting centre for hate crime. Our staff can provide advice to those who have been subjected to a hate crime or hate incident and tell you where you can get more information and support.

How do I report a hate crime or hate incident?

You can contact us on our adviceline on 03444 111 222  and one of our trained staff will explain the process and guide you through this.

You can also attend one of our Digital Access Hubs. These are located at various community venues across the city and one of our digital assistants will guide you through the process. Details of the hubs that are available, just click on the 'How We Can Help - Face To Face below:

‘How We Can Help - Face to Face’.

You can also report an incident yourself by visiting the True Vision website and completing a reporting form:

http://www.report-it.org.uk

What is a hate crime?

A hate crime is a criminal offence that is motivated by hostility or prejudice based upon a person's disability, race, religion or belief, sexual orientation and transgender identity.

Hate crimes can take many forms including:

Physical attacks such as physical assault, damage to property, offensive graffiti and arson.

Threat of attack includes offensive letters, abusive or obscene telephone calls, groups hanging around to intimidate, and unfounded, malicious complaints.

Verbal abuse, insults or harassment includes taunting, offensive leaflets and posters, abusive gestures, dumping of rubbish outside homes or through letterboxes, and bullying at school or in the workplace.

What is a hate incident?

A hate incident is any non-crime incident which is perceived by the victim or any other person to be motivated by hostility or prejudice based on a person’s disability, race, religion, alternative subculture or sexual orientation (or perceived disability, race, religion or sexual orientation) or against a person who is transgender or perceived to be transgender.

An example of this is where a person is purposely excluded from an activity because of  disabilities, sexual orientation, race, religion, alternative subculture or against a person who is transgender or perceived to be transgender.

Further information on hate crime is available on the true vision website : http://www.report-it.org.uk/home